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How Walking Can Extend Life — December 2017

How Walking Can Extend Life — December 2017


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Even Minimal Walking Offers Health Benefits

You don’t have to run or bike intensively to get the health advantages of regular exercise. A new study by the American Journal of Preventive Medicine (AJPM) showed that 120 minutes or less of moderate-intensity walking each week can add longevity to your life. 120 minutes? That’s less than 18 minutes a day!

Exercise has long been associated with a lower risk for diabetes, heart disease and some cancers. But this study is the first to separate walking from other types of exercise, and found that walking extends life in older people. Even those who walked less than the minimum recommended levels lived longer than inactive people. So, that means any amount of walking is better than none.

The Benefits of Walking

The best thing about walking is that it is easy to do. It’s gentle on your joints and it’s free. Here are some important benefits of walking:

  • Prevent or manage heart disease by strengthening the heart, improving circulation, reducing bad (LDL) cholesterol and increasing good (HDL) cholesterol.
  • Reduce the risk of stroke and prevent or manage high blood pressure.
  • Prevent or manage type 2 diabetes.
  • Strengthen bones and muscles, and improve balance and coordination.
  • Improve digestion.
  • Lighten mood.
  • Reduce fatigue, increase energy and improve sleep.
  • Maintain a healthy weight.

More About Joints

Most of our joints get their ‘nutrition’ from joint, or synovial, fluid that is circulated when we move. The more movement, the more nutrients go to the joints, and the less sore or stiff they feel. If you have arthritis, moving may be tough after periods of inactivity but it is movement that helps to protect joints from further deterioration and eases pain. Walking also helps build muscles that support the joints.

Mental Acuity

A study of 6,000 women 65 years or older performed at the University of California, San Francisco showed that age-related memory loss was lower among those who walked more. Women who walked 2.5 miles a day had a 17% loss in memory, in contrast to a 25% decline among those who walked less than a mile a week.  The risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease also decreases. Walking more than a quarter mile a day reduced the incidence of Alzheimer’s disease by half, according to the University of Virginia Health System study of men between the ages of 71 and 93.

Walking Improves Mood

A study* showed that the more steps a person took in a day, the lighter their mood. When you walk, the body releases endorphins, which give a sense of euphoria and reduce perceptions of pain. Whether you’ve had a bad day or are managing depression, a daily walk can boost your mood.
*Study by California State University, Long Beach

Moderate-Intensity Walking

What is “moderate-intensity” walking as suggested by the AJPM study? It means walking at an “average pace,” not speed-walking and not casual strolling, according to Alpa Patel, PhD, lead author of the study and researcher at the American Cancer Society. In 20 minutes, you could cover about a mile walking at an average pace and notice a small increase in your breathing.

There are many guidelines for exercise. For example, the American Heart Association recommends 30 minutes of exercise, including brisk walking, 5 days a week. Many people today wear or carry step counters and try to achieve 10,000 steps every day for better health. However, what the AJPM study helps us realize is that any walking is better than no walking. In fact, it’s the long periods of sitting that can have negative effects on health. So, taking 5 minute walking breaks during the day can protect your health.

Overcoming Barriers

I don’t have 30 minutes a day to exercise, I’m not an active person, I don’t like being outside when it’s hot or cold, I’m too tired after work. Sound familiar? These are common obstacles to starting — and continuing — a walking program.

The first step towards overcoming barriers is identifying what they are and finding solutions that work for you. If you think you don’t have 30 extra minutes to exercise, look for unexpected time slots in your day. Since you have to go to your child’s soccer game, walk along the sidelines as you watch. Or park in a distant corner of the parking lot at work and take the steps instead of the elevator. This will give you a nice walk before and after work. Encourage ‘walking meetings’ if ever possible. You may find you can manage 10 minutes sessions of walking a few times a day.

People are more active than they realize. Even if you don’t think you ‘exercise,’ consider activities like vacuuming and mowing the grass. These count as walking minutes. If you’d like to be more active, start slowly and choose activities you enjoy. Walking a dog with or without a friend can be very enjoyable. Exploring parks or museums can keep it interesting. If it’s too hot or cold outside, remember the neighborhood mall or rec center treadmill. Pick a time of day when you aren’t as tired as you might be after work, such as a short walk during a morning break or a longer one at lunchtime. Keep in mind that increasing your physical activity gives you more energy.

Get started today. Set small, manageable goals and increase them slowly. Try to make it fun by including family and friends over the holidays and by going to new places. Keep a notebook and record your progress, or let your smart phone or other device do the tracking for you.

Your KnovaSolutions nurse can help you establish goals and brain storm about ways to overcome your barriers. Call KnovaSolutions at 800/355-0885, Monday through Friday, 8 am – 5 pm, Mountain Time.

Click here to view/download the full newsletter. We encourage you to leave a comment or question below and a KnovaSolutions nurse or pharmacist will reply.

The information contained in this newsletter is for general, educational purposes. It should not be considered a replacement for consultation with your healthcare provider.  If you have concerns about your health, please contact your healthcare provider.


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Confusing Cancer Terminology — November 2017

Confusing Cancer Terminology — November 2017


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Making Sense During Difficult Times

Almost 13 million people worldwide are diagnosed with cancer every year. People may experience unexplained pain, weight loss, fatigue and other symptoms followed by screening tests, imaging, and maybe biopsies before getting the dreaded diagnosis. Learning that you or a loved one has cancer is overwhelming and stressful.

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It’s Not Just Flu Shot Season — October 2017

It’s Not Just Flu Shot Season — October 2017


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Time to Review Your Vaccination Status

Vaccines are among the most cost-effective prevention services around. They do more than protect you from getting preventable diseases; they also reduce the spread of disease. If you’ve been vaccinated for an infectious disease (measles, chickenpox, hepatitis, influenza, etc.), you greatly reduce the risk of getting that disease and the chance of spreading it to others who are not immune.

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Suffer From Low Back Pain? — September 2017

Suffer From Low Back Pain? — September 2017


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A Look at Alternative/Complementary Therapies

The U.S. spends $90 billion a year on back pain! That’s more than the combined cost of care for high blood pressure, pregnancy AND depression. Back pain is one of the top reasons people see their doctor and the leading reason people miss work. Lost time and productivity is estimated to cost another $10-20 billion.

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Deprescribing: A Growing Trend — August 2017

Deprescribing: A Growing Trend — August 2017


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What Was Good Then May Not Be Now

It is becoming more and more common for people to take five or more medications. The more medications a person takes, the greater their risk for negative health outcomes, such as reduced quality of life, increased side effects, drug interactions, physical or mental impairment, falls, addiction, hospitalization or even, death. The use of some medications, especially as people age or become sicker, can do more harm than good. There is also greater risk of taking them incorrectly—the more medications, the more confusion.

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Preventing Surprise Medical Bills — July 2017

Preventing Surprise Medical Bills — July 2017


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What to Do If You Get One

An unexpected medical bill can be a very unpleasant surprise. It is a bill for a medical service that you did not expect to receive because you thought your insurance would cover it. Surprise bills are becoming more common as our healthcare system becomes more complex and insurance companies reduce the number of providers in their network or exclude coverage for out-of-network services.

The best way to avoid surprise medical bills is to prevent them. It’s not always possible, but there are ways to minimize the risk.

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The Opioid Epidemic — May 2017

The Opioid Epidemic — May 2017


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Taking Ownership and Being Part of the Solution

You’ve heard the news reports about the dangers of opioid medications such as codeine, morphine, methadone, fentanyl, hydrocodone and oxycodone. While opioids can be an appropriate and effective treatment for pain, the U.S. has the highest rates of opioid use in the world. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, about 80% of the world’s prescribed opioids are used in the U.S. Great risk comes with such widespread use. From 2010 to 2015, more than 500,000 people died from opioid overdoses.

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Shared Healthcare Decision-Making — April 2017

Shared Healthcare Decision-Making — April 2017


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How to Improve Outcomes and Decrease Costs

Numerous studies performed in the last 10 years suggest that patients who actively participate in making healthcare decisions with their doctors report greater satisfaction with their care, better outcomes and lower costs. For example, a study reported in Health Affairs of 33,163 patients at a large healthcare facility in Minnesota showed that better informed patients cost less to treat. In the first year of the study, knowledgeable patients had 8% lower treatment costs, and, in the first half of the following year, 21% lower costs, than less involved patients.

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How Short Are Your Doctor Visits? — March 2017

How Short Are Your Doctor Visits? — March 2017


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Getting the Most Out of Your Appointments

Depending upon which source you read, the average length of time a doctor spends with each patient ranges from 5 minutes to 23 minutes. That’s not a lot of time to discuss your health history, medications, symptoms and concerns — much less talk about complicated information or a new serious condition. So how can you get what you need — and deserve —during each doctor visit? All arrows point first to having a primary care provider (PCP) with whom you develop a trusting relationship.

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Medication Errors at Home  — February 2017

Medication Errors at Home — February 2017


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How to Reduce Risk and Prevent Mistakes

Prescription and over-the-counter medications provide major health improvements for people, but they also pose potential risks. Adverse drug events — harm as a result of exposure to a medication — are associated with hundreds of thousands of emergency room visits and hospitalizations each year.

Home medication errors happen all too often. In a study at the New York University School of Medicine-Bellevue Hospital, it was found that one out of five parents who measured liquid medication for their children gave them twice the directed dose. Also, nearly all the parents measured the dose incorrectly to some degree.

Confusing ear drops and eye drops, chewing non-chewable pills, and splitting pills not designed to be split are other types of errors that happen at home.

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Wasteful Medical Spending — January 2017

Wasteful Medical Spending — January 2017


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Is There Anything You Can Do?

It is widely documented that the U.S. spends more on healthcare per person than any other country, yet much research shows that Americans are not healthier as a result. Wasteful spending accounts for 30 percent of the $3.2 trillion spent on healthcare each year. That’s $9.6 billion of waste per year! While this may seem like a challenge too large, there are ways to do your part to reduce wasteful spending.

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All in a Night’s Sleep — December 2016


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Recognizing and Treating Insomnia

Does it take more than 30 minutes to fall asleep? Do you wake more than 3 times a night? Do you get less than 6 hours of sleep? If you answered yes to these questions, you may suffer from insomnia.

Having trouble sleeping can happen to anyone but it is more common among women, middle-aged or older adults, shift workers, and those with medical conditions.

Insomnia can be acute or chronic. Lasting up to a month, acute insomnia is usually related to a stressful situation, such as an upcoming presentation or the start of a new job. Once the presentation has been given and the new job becomes more familiar, the insomnia often resolves. Chronic insomnia, occurring more than 3 nights a week for at least 3 months, can be caused by:

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Prediabetes Diagnosis is a ‘Gift’ — November 2016


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Taking Measures to Reduce Risk for Diabetes

More than 29 million Americans live with diabetes — a serious condition in which blood glucose (sugar in the blood) builds to dangerously high levels. What’s more, another 86 million live with prediabetes, that is, have strong risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes. The Center for Disease Control states that 90% of people with prediabetes don’t know they have it!

“A diagnosis of prediabetes is a gift and a wake-up call,” says Marilyn Novosel, MPH, RN, CDE, the Certified Diabetes Educator for KnovaSolutions. “Learning that you have risk factors for developing diabetes is an opportunity to do something about it sooner rather than later.” She adds that making lifestyle changes can slow the progress, reduce the possibility of long-term complications, and for some, return blood sugar levels to normal.
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Flu Season Starts Now — October 2016


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Who Should Have Flu and Pneumonia Shots?

Getting the flu can leave you feeling lousy and unable to attend school or work for as long as 2 weeks, and longer if complications develop. Further, having the flu can put you at higher risk for developing pneumonia and other serious conditions. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), getting the flu shot is “the first and best way to protect yourself and your family.”

The more people who get vaccinated, the more people will be protected from the flu. In 2010, the CDC recommended that everyone over the age of 6 months get a flu shot every year unless they have a severe, life-threatening allergy to the flu vaccine or its ingredients. People who should talk with their provider before getting the flu shot include those:
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Proton Pump Inhibitors — September 2016


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Understand the Potential Risk of Long-Term Use

Stomach acids work miracles to digest the foods we eat. But when there is too much acid, and in the wrong place, it can cause heartburn and reflux (when acid moves from the stomach back up the esophagus). It can also contribute to the development of ulcers (holes in the protective lining of the stomach, small intestine or esophagus). These conditions can cause very uncomfortable burning sensations in the chest, stomach, and even, throat. Fortunately, a variety of treatment options — over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription medications and lifestyle changes — can offer relief.

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Does Alcohol Trigger AFib? — August 2016


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Atrial Fibrillation: A Growing Concern

Atrial fibrillation (AFib or AF) is sometimes called the quivering heart. It is the most common type of irregular heartbeat, or arrhythmia. Fibrillation refers to the heart contracting very fast and irregularly.

To understand AF, it helps to think of the heart as the body’s electrical system. Each time our heart beats, an electrical signal is sent from the top of the heart to the bottom, causing it to contract and pump blood to the lungs and the rest of the body.

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Activity and Fitness Trackers: Studies Show They Get People Moving — July 2016

Activity and Fitness Trackers: Studies Show They Get People Moving — July 2016


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Have you noticed people wearing stylish wrist ware or other devices, and talking about how many steps they’ve taken? Activity and fitness trackers like FitBit, Garmin, Mi Band, Jawbones and pedometers represent a burgeoning business projected to reach $19 billion by 2018. These devices are used to monitor and measure physical activity, heart rate, sleep patterns and more. A review of studies published in the Journal of the American Medical Association concluded that use of a pedometer — a device that records steps taken and distance —is associated with significant increases in physical activity and decreases in body mass index and blood pressure.

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Avoiding the Bulge After 50 — June 2016


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How to Maintain a Healthy Weight

As we age, it becomes harder to drop pounds and maintain a healthy weight. That’s because our metabolism slows down, we burn fewer calories and we lose lean muscle mass. It can be discouraging and for some, dangerous. But there are ways to maintain a healthy weight after 50, and it’s never too soon — or too late — to start.

Our metabolism slows as we age due to falling hormone levels. As testosterone levels drop, men tend to add body fat to their abdominal area. As estrogen levels fall, women often see a shifting of weight from their hips and buttocks to their mid-section. Our bodies also begin losing lean muscle mass starting around age 30, which may be a result of less active lifestyles. Being less active usually leads to burning fewer calories, and that often increases weight and fat mass, and decreases muscle mass.

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New CDC Guidelines for Opioid Use — May 2016

New CDC Guidelines for Opioid Use — May 2016


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Safe Use Saves Lives and Reduces Complications

Opioids, or narcotic medications, are powerful pain killers. They can be an appropriate and effective part of managing pain, but the overuse and misuse of these prescription drugs has become a public health crisis. Since 1999, the use of opioids has quadrupled and more than 165,000 people have died from their use. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) estimates that 40 Americans die from opioid overdoses every day. To improve the safety of opioids, the CDC released new guidelines in March for how these medications should be prescribed.

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Telehealth: Remote Healthcare — April 2016

Telehealth: Remote Healthcare — April 2016


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Transforming Modern Medical Care

While healthcare has traditionally been delivered in a doctor’s office, hospital or outpatient clinic, technology continues to transform modern medical care. Telehealth is a broad term to describe remote healthcare services using video-conferencing equipment, mobile devices, internet access, remote monitoring devices and other tools. Telehealth promises to increase the contact between a patient and his or her providers, especially for those who live in rural areas or for whom travel to a medical facility is difficult (or even for busy working parents).

Because it can save travel time and expense for providers and patients, telehealth can improve the chances that people will receive preventive care and better management of chronic conditions. Telehealth can facilitate specialist consultations, whether the provider is across the state or across the world.

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The Shingles Vaccine: Your Risk for Shingles As You Age — March 2016

The Shingles Vaccine: Your Risk for Shingles As You Age — March 2016


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Shingles is a viral infection caused by varicella zoster, the same virus that causes chicken pox. Anyone who has had chicken pox can get shingles since the virus stays inactive in the body’s nerve tissue and can re-emerge later. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) estimates that about 1 million Americans get shingles each year, and that half of all shingles cases occur in people 60 years or older.

While anyone with a history of chickenpox can get shingles (even children), it is most common among people over 50 and those with weakened immune systems due to cancer, HIV/AIDS and other conditions. Taking certain medications, such as chemotherapy for cancer, steroids, and those drugs used to prevent rejection of transplanted organs, can increase the risk of developing shingles. Asthma is under study as a potential risk factor for developing shingles.

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Screening for Cancer. Breast and Colorectal Cancer Screening — February 2016

Screening for Cancer. Breast and Colorectal Cancer Screening — February 2016


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Breast and Colorectal Cancer Screening

The American Cancer Society (ACS) estimates there will be nearly 1.7 million new cancer diagnoses, and nearly 600,000 cancer deaths, in 2016. While there are several risk factors for cancer you can’t control (gender, race, age, family history), there are lifestyle actions that have been associated with the prevention of cancer. Experts recommend living a healthy lifestyle, including not smoking, eating a well-balanced diet (more vegetables, fruits and whole grains/less processed food and red meat), protecting against sunburn, exercising regularly, keeping a healthy work/family balance, and having preventive screening tests that are right for you. Identifying cancer at its earlier stages increases the possibility of successful treatment.

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Know Your Out-of-Pocket Costs — January 2016

Know Your Out-of-Pocket Costs — January 2016


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Know Your Out-of-Pocket Costs
With Your High-Deductible Health Plan.

A growing number of people are covered by high-deductible health plans (HDHPs). As the name implies, these plans have higher deductibles than traditional insurance plans in exchange for lower monthly premiums. HDHPs are designed to make health insurance more affordable and to provide for coverage for catastrophic illness. The deductible amount specified by the insurance plan is the amount that the insured person must pay out-of-pocket until eligible healthcare expenses are covered in a given year.

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