Can a Backache Be Contagious?


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Contagious BackacheIf you have a backache, a knee sprain, or some other injury to the body’s structure of bones, joints, and muscles, the risk that someone else in your family has such an injury rises by more than a third.

That’s what researchers at HCMS Group LLC discovered in analyzing healthcare data on more than 3.7 million people whose medical benefits were provided by more than 200 employers. They found that when a covered employee has medical costs for treating a musculoskeletal condition, there’s a 27% likelihood that a dependent will, too. That compares with a 20% risk for dependents when the employed family member doesn’t have such an injury.

Among dependents, the risk is higher for adults than for children, but the findings are consistent across all groups. (See figure 1 below.)

Likelihood of Dependent Musculoskeletal Cost

For more than a century, economists and psychologists have observed a contagion effect in social networks and workplaces. One 1996 study found that health symptoms often spread through groups of workers without any physical cause. In 2000, researchers, led by Dr. Hank Gardner,  the CEO and principal owner of HCMS Group, analyzed data on claims for workers’ compensation and family leave. They found evidence that workers learning from each other about the benefits fueled a contagion effect in filing of claims.

With respect to musculoskeletal conditions, multiple cases within a family can have significant cost ramifications. Average annual expenses for treatment of these conditions range from $500 to $55,087, according to HCMS Group research. The low end of the scale is for the healthiest 50% of the population. At the high end are those in the 5% of the population who account for 50% of healthcare costs. People in this group have an average of 10 other conditions, with several medications and specialists involved in their treatment. (See previous blog post. For information on HCMS Group’s 5|50 Solution™ designed to address this problem, click here.)

 

— Robert L. Simison, HCMS Group Communications

On behalf of HCMS Group Data Analytics

 

This is the final installment in the series on musculoskeletal discoveries. Please visit the links below to read the other posts in this series:

1. Musculoskeletal: Top Contributor to Total Claim Costs

2. Musculoskeletal Costs Nearly Twice that of Condition-Specific Costs

3. The $55, 087 Backache

 


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